Seton Hall University

Celebrating Black History Month

February is the commemoration of African American or Black History Month. The annual theme for Black History month is determined by the Association for the Study of African American Life and History. The theme for this year is "Black Health and Wellness."

What is the origin of Black History Month? This is the brainchild of noted historian Carter G. Woodson and other prominent African Americans. Woodson was the first PhD graduate from Harvard whose parents were enslaved, and he had been a sharecropper early in his life.

In 1926, Woodson initiated the first "Negro History Week," on February 7, to celebrate and raise awareness of Black history. Woodson chose that week specifically because it covered the birthdays of Frederick Douglass (February 14) and Abraham Lincoln (February 12). In 1976 Woodson's organization, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, recommended that the commemoration become a month-long celebration and was renamed Black History Month. Since 1976, every U.S. president has officially designated the month of February as Black History Month.

Since 1976, every U.S. president has officially designated the month of February as Black History Month.

2022 Black History Month Events

Black Masculinity and Manhood
February 16

Dr. Troy Harden, Director of the Race and Ethnic Studies Institute at Texas A&M University, will deliver a presentation on Black Masculinity with Malcolm X and Dr. King as his points of departure.

DEI Anti-Racism Training
February 18

Join members from the Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Committee for an interactive workshop on anti-racism and exploring race, bias, and identity. Develop strategies and learn more about campus resources that can help you become an upstander and ally.

Black Health Matters
February 23

Representatives from Health Services and CAPS will have a table with health information and resources highlighting black health. Free raffle entry.

Between the World and Me Book Discussion
February 24

Join Associate Professor Jon Radwan as he leads a discussion of the 2015 National Book Award Winner for nonfiction, Between the World and Me, by Ta-Nehisi Coates. This event is co-sponsored by Academic Affairs, DEI, and South Orange Maplewood Cross-Cultural Works.

Racial Essentialism
February 25

Dr. John Tawa, assistant professor of psychology at Mount Holyoke, will present his research on “Racial Essentialism: What it is, why it matters, and what we can do about it”. The lecture will take place on Friday Feb 25th from 11am - 12pm.

Black History Month 2021

The Black Family: Representation, Identity, and Diversity